28 February 2020

Alcoa employees help out black cockatoos


Cockatubes
Alcoa Kwinana Refinery employees Jamie Jones, Tony Tran, Ashley Winter and Matthew Cox with Mundijong local John.

Threatened and endangered black cockatoos have 112 extra nesting boxes, also known as cockatubes, thanks to the combined efforts of volunteers from Alcoa, Landcare SerpentineJarrahdale (Landcare-SJ) and the Peel Harvey Catchment Council (PHCC).

Alcoa’s Kwinana Refinery also donated the material used in the cockatube base and lids.

The cockatubes are destined for landcare groups in the Eastern States to assist areas affected by recent bushfires.

Landcare SJ’s Francis Smit said he was overwhelmed by the support and the number of boxes constructed during the volunteering day.

“The cockatubes are an integral part of helping these critically endangered species, so we really appreciate Alcoa’s support with both the donation of the base material and with their volunteers to build the boxes,” Mr Smit said.

Kwinana Refinery Community Relations Officer Ashley Winter said volunteering was part of the culture at Alcoa.

“The company is committed to improving the environment and giving back to the communities in which it operates,” Ashley said. “This was great to get a bunch of my colleagues together, roll up their sleeves and work towards a common goal of helping the Black Cockatoos in bushfire impacted areas.”

Alcoa is also proud to partner with Birdlife Australia on a program to help the recovery of the black cockatoo species across an area of the Swan Coastal Plain stretching from Kwinana in the north, east to Serpentine-Jarrahdale and south to Harvey. The program focuses on research, education, and habitat and food-stock restoration.

 

ENDS

 

Media contact: Ashley Winter  0429637350  ashley.winter@alcoa.com