Stewardship Policy
XVI. Voluntary Shoreline Stewardship Measures

 


Table 2
Voluntary Actions Adjoining Property Owners Can
Take to Help Preserve Reservoir Water Quality

Activity Action
Property Development Plan your home site to minimize the opportunity of drainage of water from your house, driveway, or lawn directly into the reservoir.
  Establish a building setback and establish or maintain a natural forested buffer between your lawn and the reservoir shoreline, even where not required for eligibility for a private pier or reservoir access.
  Keep clearing of vegetation and creation of lawns to a minimum.
  Install, or be sure that your builder installs, silt fences and other appropriate forms of erosion and sedimentation control on your property to prevent runoff of sediment into the reservoirs.
  Minimize the size of paved driveways and parking areas on your property.
Yard Care Minimize use of fertilizers, herbicides, and pesticides on your lawn and in your yard.
  Convert unused portions of lawn into gardens, shrubs, trees, or meadows.
  Plant native species and hardy grasses, which require little or no specialized care (see Table 3).
Boating Use petroleum products with caution and take steps to prevent them from getting into the water.
  Wash boats away from the water and use biodegradable, non-phosphate detergents.
Household Maintenance Keep septic systems and drain fields well maintained. Have septic tanks pumped and inspected routinely. Have drain fields inspected, particularly if any odor is observed.
  Wash cars and other vehicles away from the water.
Agricultural Activities Maintain a forested shoreline buffer.
  Install fencing to keep farm animals out of the reservoirs.
  Institute best-management practices as recommended by the State and USDA for crop and animal production.

 

A. Preserve and Create Natural Forested Shoreline

 

A natural forested shoreline is essential to the continued health and beauty of the Project reservoirs. Clearing of native trees and vegetation from around the water’s edge destroys habitat for resident wildlife, is detrimental to water quality, and speeds shoreline erosion. By leaving or recreating a natural forested buffer between a house or yard and the reservoir, adjoining property owners can help provide habitat for birds and wildlife, improve water quality, and reduce shoreline erosion. Yadkin recommends that adjoining property owners, even where private pier eligibility or reservoir access are not concerns, consider the following measures on their property to help preserve the shoreline:

 

  • Place buildings and structures at least 100 feet from the shoreline. The further from the shoreline a structure is constructed, the less impact the construction will have on the reservoir and shoreline environment.
  • Recreate or maintain a forested buffer of native trees and shrubs between lawn and the shoreline. Generally, the wider the buffer, the more effective it will be in reducing environmental impacts to the reservoir and shoreline. Keep clearing of trees and vegetation from property near the reservoirs to a minimum.
  • Use native trees, shrubs, and flowers for landscaping yards and gardens (see Table 3). Native plants provide optimum food and habitat for birds and wildlife.


B. Protect and Create Habitat for Fish

 

To help protect the excellent fishery that currently exists in the Project reservoirs, adjoining property owners are encouraged to take the following actions to help protect, preserve, and recreate important fish habitat.

 

  • Avoid swimming and boating in and around stands of aquatic vegetation. Aquatic vegetation provides premier habitat for fish and other organisms.
  • Use downed trees and limbs to create brush piles in the water. Such material provides important cover for fish.


C. Protect Water Quality

 

The greatest source of pollutants to the Project reservoirs is from nonpoint sources. Nonpoint source pollution is generally created by runoff of water from cleared land into tributary rivers and streams, as well as into the reservoirs themselves. As water runs off cleared land, it picks up sediment and damaging pollutants such as nitrogen, phosphorus, and toxins. As development around the reservoirs increases and more land is cleared, pollutant input from nonpoint sources will continue to increase and reservoir water quality will continue to decline. Yadkin has established policies to reduce runoff and diminish the impacts of nonpoint source pollution on reservoir water quality. Yadkin strongly encourages adjoining property owners to consider the following measures to help reduce the effect of shoreline development on reservoir water quality:

 

  • Establish a building setback and establish or maintain a natural forested buffer between your lawn and the reservoir shoreline, even where not required for eligibility for a private pier or reservoir access.
  • Discontinue or minimize the use of fertilizer, herbicides, and pesticides on your lawn, in your house and in your yard. Consider the use of biological controls or try to select products that are labeled as environmentally friendly.
  • Keep mowing of lawns to a minimum, or raise the blade height on your lawn mower.
  • Use petroleum products with caution and take steps to prevent them from getting into the water.
  • Keep septic systems and leach fields in good working order and adhere to established county requirements for the location, design, and operation of septic systems.
  • When doing construction or earthwork, install silt fences and other appropriate forms of sedimentation and erosion control on your property to prevent erosion and runoff into the reservoir or tributary streams.

 

As a reminder, Yadkin prohibits any discharge or dumping of any materials into the reservoirs. Do not discard paints, cleaners, solvents or other household materials directly into the water. Yadkin also prohibits the spraying of insecticides or herbicides directly into the reservoirs.

 

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