Climate Change, Canopies and Wildlife in the Ecuadorian Andes
 
The Ecuadorian Andes host some the world's most exceptional biodiversity hotspots. Unfortunately, the distribution of many species has been dramatically reduced due to habitat loss and hunting. To make matters worse, the Andes are now predicted to experience heightened warming as a result of climate change. Such warming may result in a loss of many plants and the species that rely on them. Alcoa Volunteers Denis Drouin (Becancour, Canada), Molly Brown (Lafayette, Indiana, USA) and Agnes Jozsa (Székesfehérvár, Hungary) will help monitor populations of large mammals in the reserve such as Andean cats, pumas, endangered spectacled bears, and ocelots. Because these animals need high quality forest habitat to survive, they act as “umbrella species” whose protection will also ensure the conservation of countless other forest animals and plants. Data from this project will help answer determine whether existing reserves and corridors are sufficient to protect the wealth of wildlife in Ecuador's forests in the face of climate change.
 
Expedition location:  Santa Lucia Reserve, NW Ecuador
Expedition date:  September 25 – October 5

 
 Denis Drouin’s Diary
 Molly Brown’s Diary
 Agnes Jozsa’s Diary
 
 

Earthwatch Institute


Learn more about Alcoa's international nonprofit partner, which supports scientific field research worldwide.
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Climate Change, Canopies and Wildlife in the Ecuadorian Andes


Learn more about the expedition and its scientists.
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