Climate Change at the Arctic's Edge
Global warming is being felt first and most dramatically at the edge of the Arctic, where the world's peatlands run in a broad strip around the globe. These wetlands contain as much as 30% of all terrestrial carbon, often locked in permafrost. If global warming thaws the permafrost, the decomposing peat could release its carbon in the form of carbon dioxide and methane—a far more potent greenhouse gas. Understanding the current status of Arctic ecosystems will help scientists predict the impact of rapid climate change. Sasanka Thilakasiri (Kwinana, Australia) and Ralph Bathelt (Massena, New York, USA) will help Dr. Peter Kershaw and other scientists monitor ecosystem responses to global warming. October 3-13


Ralph Bathelt's Diary
Sasanka Thilakasiri's Diary



Related Sites


National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
Learn why and how scientists study climate change in the Arctic.
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Earthwatch Institute


Learn more about this international nonprofit, which supports scientific field research worldwide.
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Climate Change at the Arctic's Edge


Learn more about the expedition and its scientists.
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