Each year, Alcoa Foundation sponsors teachers from around the world to attend Keystone Science School’s Key Issues Institute in Silverthorne, Colorado.


Key Issues Institute is a professional development program that brings together educators from Australia, Canada, Mexico, the United Kingdom and the United States to investigate environmental issues while utilizing a non-biased framework. 


Teachers who attend the program spend one week exploring environmental issues in an outdoor classroom and learn how to engage students in activities that make science come to life.   


Teachers leave Key Issues Institute with curricula, a framework to apply to their existing curricula, lab equipment, and support from staff and other educators. Past participants have addressed diverse issues with their students including: water and air quality, wetland degradation, waste management, and recycling.

 

Teachers selected to attend the nationally accredited, Key Issues Institute: 

  • Denise Honeybone, Australia
  • Nicole Entz, Australia
  • Catherine Haynes, California
  • Vicki Hungerford, California
  • Frédéric Bénichou, Canada
  • Rémy Matte, Canada
  • Alexandra Samson, Canada
  • Marie-Lyne Binet, Canada
  • Erin Allen, Iowa
  • Joni Nelson, Iowa
  • Kevin Roling, Iowa
  • Brooke Banker, Iowa
  • Dennis Mintner, Indiana
  • Erin Williamson, Indiana
  • Veronica Ortiz Maldonado, Mexico
  • Laura Nino, Mexico
  • Maegan Hill, Michigan
  • Norine Hull, New York
  • Jodi LaGarry, New York
  • Eleanor Regan, Ohio
  • Susan Schobe, Ohio
  • Daniel Cabrol, Pennsylvania
  • Elyse Jurgen, Pennsylvania
  • Christina Scifo, Pennsylvania
  • Michele Thomas, Pennsylvania
  • Matthew Pickwell, Tennessee
  • Michael Fullard, United Kingdom
  • Michael Hawes, United Kingdom
  • Monika Christensen, Washington
  • Tina Nicpan-Brown, Washington
  • Jake Bullis, Washington


Keystone Science School
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Key Issues Institute
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KSS is an intense, effective, and engaging facilitator for science issues. I have found this opportunity to work with KSS to be extremely valuable to myself as a teacher but also for the students who will enter my classroom. 
— Julianne Foulk - Lancaster, Pennsylvania

 

This was an incomparable experience – easily the best and most useful professional development I have attended.
— Amelia Brown - Knoxville, Tennessee

 

This has been the best experience. I have learned so much and having been able to share ideas with teachers from other countries was invaluable.
— Lydia Prior - United Kingdom

 

Alcoa Foundation’s commitment to their communities is unmatched and we are thrilled to be a valuable partner. We are excited every year to work with Alcoa Foundation teachers in the Rocky Mountains and spread our knowledge and commitment to environmental science and STEM education.

— Olivia Grover - Educator Programs Director, Keystone Science School

Photo Gallery

Teachers work to identify macroinvertebrates found in a Colorado stream. Ericka Trotty, Gayle Cunningham and Jennifer Keen determine the pH of water in French Creek. Rachel Kent and Terri Abraham collect macroinvertebrates using a kick net. The chemical characteristics of French Creek are analyzed by Hillary Fleenor. The biodiversity of a stream is found by collecting insects from the water. Welcome to Colorado The Keystone Center home of the Alcoa Foundation-sponsored Key Issues Institute. Middle school teachers from across the United States attend the Keystone Key Issues Institute Pictured are four of the 15 teachers sponsored by Alcoa Foundation. Audra Leach, (center), Northwestern Regional High School, Winsted, Conn. Julie Gielow, James A. Garfield School, Cleveland, Ohio The teachers prepare for water sampling project. Examining the biological diversity of the river. Tiffany King, Whitehall Middle School, Whitehall, Mich. This guidebook helps the teachers identify water creators. Measuring the physical properties of the river Reta Berry, Empire Computech Center, Cleveland, Ohio Teachers break into small groups to share ideas, techniques and curriculum. The magnificent Rockies
Teachers work to identify macroinvertebrates found in a Colorado stream.
Teachers work to identify macroinvertebrates found in a Colorado stream.
Ericka Trotty, Gayle Cunningham and Jennifer Keen determine the pH of water in French Creek.
Ericka Trotty, Gayle Cunningham and Jennifer Keen determine the pH of water in French Creek.
Rachel Kent and Terri Abraham collect macroinvertebrates using a kick net.
Rachel Kent and Terri Abraham collect macroinvertebrates using a kick net.
The chemical characteristics of French Creek are analyzed by Hillary Fleenor.
The chemical characteristics of French Creek are analyzed by Hillary Fleenor.
The biodiversity of a stream is found by collecting insects from the water.
The biodiversity of a stream is found by collecting insects from the water.
Welcome to Colorado
Welcome to Colorado
The Keystone Center home of the Alcoa Foundation-sponsored Key Issues Institute.
The Keystone Center home of the Alcoa Foundation-sponsored Key Issues Institute.
Middle school teachers from across the United States attend the Keystone Key Issues Institute
Middle school teachers from across the United States attend the Keystone Key Issues Institute to learn new ways to teach science, by doing science.
Pictured are four of the 15 teachers sponsored by Alcoa Foundation.
Pictured are four of the 15 teachers sponsored by Alcoa Foundation. (l to r) Julie Gielow, (Cleveland); Reta Berry, (Cleveland); Audra Leach (Winsted, Conn.); and Tiffany King, (Whitehall, Mich.)
Audra Leach, (center), Northwestern Regional High School, Winsted, Conn.
Audra Leach, (center), Northwestern Regional High School, Winsted, Conn.
Julie Gielow, James A. Garfield School, Cleveland, Ohio
Julie Gielow, James A. Garfield School, Cleveland, Ohio
The teachers prepare for water sampling project.
The teachers prepare for water sampling project.
Examining the biological diversity of the river.
Examining the biological diversity of the river. The teachers used nets to gather insects from the river. The health of the river was determined by the diversity of the insects found.
Tiffany King, Whitehall Middle School, Whitehall, Mich.
Tiffany King, Whitehall Middle School, Whitehall, Mich.
This guidebook helps the teachers identify water creators.
This guidebook helps the teachers identify water creators.
Measuring the physical properties of the river
Measuring the physical properties of the river, such as width, depth, surface velocity and discharge volume.
Reta Berry, Empire Computech Center, Cleveland, Ohio
Reta Berry, Empire Computech Center, Cleveland, Ohio
Teachers break into small groups to share ideas, techniques and curriculum.
Teachers break into small groups to share ideas, techniques and curriculum.
The magnificent Rockies
The magnificent Rockies