Alcoa Foundation support to Keystone Science School has equipped more than 250 educators from Alcoa communities in Australia, Canada, Jamaica, the UK, and U.S. with the knowledge to investigate complex environmental issues with their students.
 
This year, 30 teachers were selected to attend the nationally accredited, Key Issues Institute in Colorado. 
  • Yvonne Anson, Australia
  • Michael Smith, Australia
  • Phillippe Levesque, Canada
  • Joanie Parenteau, Canada
  • Katie Bretz, Indiana
  • Salima Oudghiri, Indiana
  • Crystal Wissner, Indiana
  • Heather Cress, Iowa
  • Cynthia Budhoo-Hyatt, Jamaica
  • Camille Lambert, Jamaica
  • Jen Szegda, Michigan
  • Macy Taranko, Michigan
  • Darcie Fregoe, New York
  • Randal Freiman, New York
  • Robin Prokop, Ohio
  • Laura Smuts, Ohio
  • Julianne Foulk, Pennsylvania
  • Connie Jackson, Pennsylvania
  • Ashley Senopole, Pennsylvania
  • Ellen Wright, Pennsylvania
  • Amelia Adams, Tennessee
  • Julianne Brandt, Tennessee
  • Ryan Smiga, Texas
  • Melissa Veach, Texas
  • Ann Hilke, Torrance
  • Karen McCormick, Torrance
  • Andy Brennan, United Kingdom
  • Lydia Prior, United Kingdom
  • Sarah Grim, Washington
  • Teri Larson, Washington
Environment and Education

Keystone Science School

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Key Issues Institute

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“This program has given me the experience to experience science education as a student, but also to create a huge network of other teachers that we can call upon afterwards. I’ve been amazed at how much I’ve learned this week.”

Julie Gielow, James A. Garfield School, Cleveland, Ohio

 

“The best part of the Keystone program is that you are not told how to teach it. You are pretending to be the kids, which is more engaging and exciting. You are actually thinking like the kids.”
Audra Leach, Northwestern Regional High School, Winsted, Connecticut

Photo Gallery

Teachers work to identify macroinvertebrates found in a Colorado stream. Ericka Trotty, Gayle Cunningham and Jennifer Keen determine the pH of water in French Creek. Rachel Kent and Terri Abraham collect macroinvertebrates using a kick net. The chemical characteristics of French Creek are analyzed by Hillary Fleenor. The biodiversity of a stream is found by collecting insects from the water. Welcome to Colorado The Keystone Center home of the Alcoa Foundation-sponsored Key Issues Institute. Middle school teachers from across the United States attend the Keystone Key Issues Institute Pictured are four of the 15 teachers sponsored by Alcoa Foundation. Audra Leach, (center), Northwestern Regional High School, Winsted, Conn. Julie Gielow, James A. Garfield School, Cleveland, Ohio The teachers prepare for water sampling project. Examining the biological diversity of the river. Tiffany King, Whitehall Middle School, Whitehall, Mich. This guidebook helps the teachers identify water creators. Measuring the physical properties of the river Reta Berry, Empire Computech Center, Cleveland, Ohio Teachers break into small groups to share ideas, techniques and curriculum. The magnificent Rockies
Teachers work to identify macroinvertebrates found in a Colorado stream.
Teachers work to identify macroinvertebrates found in a Colorado stream.
Ericka Trotty, Gayle Cunningham and Jennifer Keen determine the pH of water in French Creek.
Ericka Trotty, Gayle Cunningham and Jennifer Keen determine the pH of water in French Creek.
Rachel Kent and Terri Abraham collect macroinvertebrates using a kick net.
Rachel Kent and Terri Abraham collect macroinvertebrates using a kick net.
The chemical characteristics of French Creek are analyzed by Hillary Fleenor.
The chemical characteristics of French Creek are analyzed by Hillary Fleenor.
The biodiversity of a stream is found by collecting insects from the water.
The biodiversity of a stream is found by collecting insects from the water.
Welcome to Colorado
Welcome to Colorado
The Keystone Center home of the Alcoa Foundation-sponsored Key Issues Institute.
The Keystone Center home of the Alcoa Foundation-sponsored Key Issues Institute.
Middle school teachers from across the United States attend the Keystone Key Issues Institute
Middle school teachers from across the United States attend the Keystone Key Issues Institute to learn new ways to teach science, by doing science.
Pictured are four of the 15 teachers sponsored by Alcoa Foundation.
Pictured are four of the 15 teachers sponsored by Alcoa Foundation. (l to r) Julie Gielow, (Cleveland); Reta Berry, (Cleveland); Audra Leach (Winsted, Conn.); and Tiffany King, (Whitehall, Mich.)
Audra Leach, (center), Northwestern Regional High School, Winsted, Conn.
Audra Leach, (center), Northwestern Regional High School, Winsted, Conn.
Julie Gielow, James A. Garfield School, Cleveland, Ohio
Julie Gielow, James A. Garfield School, Cleveland, Ohio
The teachers prepare for water sampling project.
The teachers prepare for water sampling project.
Examining the biological diversity of the river.
Examining the biological diversity of the river. The teachers used nets to gather insects from the river. The health of the river was determined by the diversity of the insects found.
Tiffany King, Whitehall Middle School, Whitehall, Mich.
Tiffany King, Whitehall Middle School, Whitehall, Mich.
This guidebook helps the teachers identify water creators.
This guidebook helps the teachers identify water creators.
Measuring the physical properties of the river
Measuring the physical properties of the river, such as width, depth, surface velocity and discharge volume.
Reta Berry, Empire Computech Center, Cleveland, Ohio
Reta Berry, Empire Computech Center, Cleveland, Ohio
Teachers break into small groups to share ideas, techniques and curriculum.
Teachers break into small groups to share ideas, techniques and curriculum.
The magnificent Rockies
The magnificent Rockies