partnering stronger communities
 
Miracle metal shines by the sea
 
Thunder storms did not dampen the spirits of invited guests at Alcoa of Australia’s annual Sculpture by the Sea partnership celebration and exhibition viewing in March.
 
The unseasonably grey and wet day at Western Australia’s most iconic beach in Cottesloe was also the scene for Alcoa’s 50th anniversary celebrations, attended by some 150 government, industry, community, supplier and media stakeholders.
 
For nine years and since Sculpture by the Sea’s arrival in Perth, Alcoa of Australia has proudly sponsored the popular community and arts event which this year featured 71 sculptures by Australian and international artists.
 
As the major partner of Sculpture by the Sea, Alcoa of Australia sponsored five local artists. Local artist Ben Juniper, son of acclaimed Australian artist Robert Juniper (recently deceased), explained that the sponsorship meant artists could gain experience with new materials that would otherwise be unavailable to them. 
 
“The continued material sponsorship offered by Alcoa allows artists who may not ordinarily be able to afford to work in this medium the latitude to experiment freely. This has produced some wonderful and unique creations that the company can rightly be proud of,” said Ben.
 
“In this year’s piece, I cut high tensile aluminium to shape using a plasma cutter. The material was bent to the desired shape using a high powered hydraulic press and the individual components welded together with a three phase welder specifically set up for aluminium welding. The completed sculpture was coated in a special wax to prevent oxidization.”
 
In addition to materials support, the company ensured 300 students from schools around its Western Australia operations could take part free of charge in the Alcoa School Education Program
 
A further 2400 school children from across the Perth metropolitan area also participated in the program which offers students the opportunity to participate in hands-on workshops with exhibiting artists. They made their own mini masterpieces from many materials including aluminium.

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Founding Director of Sculpture by the Sea David Handley and Alcoa’s Alan Cransberg with Ben Juniper’s aluminium sculpture ‘Ghost gum’.



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Guests interact with the ‘How close we are’ sculpture which represents a giant needle penetrating the earth and reminding us how connected we are through technology. Moving through the ‘eye of the needle’ lights the tip of the needle in Europe’s Denmark.



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Walking through ‘Mengenang’ which is Indonesian for Remembrance. This sculpture started as a reflection on the two Bali bombings and evolved as a poignant and ephemeral wind driven sound installation. It takes the form of a forest of 222 bamboo poles, each one representing the people lost in the 2002 and 2005 bombings.



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Students from WA’s Harvey Primary School met artist Richard Hammer while taking part in the Alcoa School Education Program. Richard’s artwork ‘Dr Weatherington’ keeps an eye on the weather, especially on the winds.