part of our everyday lives

miracle metal ideal for sculpture by the sea
It’s light weight, endlessly recyclable, resistant to corrosion and aesthetically stunning: a few of the reasons aluminium features in 10 artworks at this year’s Sculpture by the Sea in Perth.

2011 marks the seventh year of Alcoa of Australia’s partnership with the iconic sculpture exhibition and, once again, we have supported several artists who chose to sculpt with aluminium.

Three West Australians have been sponsored by Alcoa: Maris Raudzins, Irene Osborne and Nick Horn - all receiving aluminium from Alcoa.

  • Irene Osborne’s sculpture, ‘phytoplankton/ diatom series’, is made entirely of aluminium.
  • Maris Raudzins’ sculpture, ‘sweet sixteen’, is made wholly of aluminium.
  • Nick Horn’s sculpture, ‘everything that happens doesn’t mean something else’, is made from aluminium, timber, concrete and paint.
 
“I feel very fortunate to have been successful in my application for the Alcoa materials support,” said Irene Osborne, whose aluminium sculpture is on display near the Cottesloe Beach groyne.

“This [sponsorship] has been very valuable to me as an artist and has given me the freedom to be less restricted in making my artworks,” she said.

Alcoa supplied the structure and cladding for Nick Horn’s piece.On working with aluminium, Nick said: “It’s easy to work with, easy to join, cut and bend. I work on my own, so being a lighter product means I can move it about by myself.”

“Aluminium is a great sculptural material, because it is light, versatile and recyclable,” added Irene.

Alcoa of Australia Managing Director, Alan Cransberg, said: “Many people don’t realise it, but aluminium is all around us all the time – in buildings, outdoor furniture, ipods, computers, mobile phones, jumbo jets, cars and more – and for three weeks it’s on display for West Aussies to see in the form of sculpture at Cottesloe.

“This displays its versatility – and that’s what I love about the product we make.

“We call aluminium a miracle metal for a number of reasons… of course it can be used in so many different products but also, importantly, it’s such a sustainable material. We’ve done modelling to show that the increased use of aluminium in transport has the potential to make the entire aluminium industry greenhouse gas neutral by 2030*.”

Alcoa’s partnership with Sculpture by the Sea also includes the 'Alcoa School Education Program' which sees 2200 students, 350 from schools around Alcoa’s operations, participate in hands-on workshops with exhibiting artists, creating mini-masterpieces of their own using aluminium wire and aluminium foil.

In addition, another 6000 students visit Sculpture by the Sea, learning more about the arts, as their teachers utilise the online teaching resources available as part of the wider ‘Alcoa School Education Program’. Read more under the ‘partnering stronger communities’ section of this newsletter.

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L-R: Alcoa's Alan Cransberg, Sculpture by the Sea Director David Handley, WA Minister for the Arts John Day, WA Premier Colin Barnett next to Maris Raudzins' sculpture 'sweet sixteen' made from aluminium



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Irene Osborne with her aluminium sculptures 'phytoplankton/ diatom series'



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Children from Pinjarra Primary School (near Pinjarra Refinery) enjoy Sculpture by the Sea



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North Parmelia Primary School (near Kwinana Refinery) visited the exhibition thanks to Alcoa's partnership



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Students from Harvey Primary School (near Wagerup Refinery)



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Bronwyn Berman's sculpture 'from earth to sky' made from aluminium, stainless steel and timber



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Alan Cransberg with Sculpture by the Sea Director David Handley