part of our everyday lives
 
aluminium in sculpture
Our product, aluminium, is an important part of our lives. It’s everywhere, from drink cans, to bikes, to cars - and not least in art and sculpture. 
 
Aluminium was showcased in the form of sculpture at Cottesloe Beach in Western Australia this month as part of Sculpture by the Sea – Perth’s largest outdoor art exhibition.  Of the 62 sculptures on show, ten were made wholly or in part of aluminium.
 
As a co-principal partner of Sculpture by the Sea, Alcoa helped bring the arts to more than 100,000 West Australians.  Our partnership supports artists who choose to sculpt with aluminium, as well as the three week Sculpture by the Sea Alcoa Schools Education Program.
 
The Alcoa Schools Education Program saw over 1400 school children, many from around our operational areas, workshop sculpture with some of the exhibition’s artists.   The program gave kids the chance to express themselves through art and learn about aluminium.  The sculpture artists helped the children create their own mini masterpieces using aluminium foil and aluminium wire.
 
A special workshop was also held for children of Alcoans.  Cornelia Major who works at Alcoa’s Booragoon head office took her two children along. “My family had a seriously great time.  Sculpture by the Sea is such a fun, easy way to introduce kids to art,” Cornelia said.
 
“The workshop was led by one of the artists who had her work on display at Sculpture by the Sea.  She talked with the kids about art, and got them all to climb through her sculpture and explore it, before the children got to make their own sculptures.
 
“They used wire and aluminium and Tania, the artist, was very patient and supportive - so it was probably no surprise that the kids created some amazing art.”
 
Michaela O’Loughlin who works in HR at the Huntly mine site said the workshop was a lovely way for the children to experience sculpture which they might not otherwise have had the opportunity to do.
 
“They loved interacting with the sculptures on the beach.  My kids were very proud of their own creations and took their sculptures to school the next day for news,” Michaela said.
 
Joe Palandri who works at our Pinjarra Refinery said: “My two daughters, Claire and Neeve, thought the workshop was great.  They took their sculptures home and continued to work on them all week - I think I know what I may get for Fathers day this year!”
 
“What a fabulous back drop for my kids to play safely in the beautiful constructed sculptures that talented artists have created.  It opened my children’s eyes at the possibilities available if they open they minds to it,” said Val Giusto, one of Alcoa’s Strategic Material Coordinators.
 
Clare Davidson said the experience appears to have inspired her son’s creative side. “Josh has been grinning since the workshop and has proudly paraded around the house telling anyone that will listen that he is a famous artist.”
 
“Our children have been showing their creations to their friends, classrooms and anyone else who listens or shows interest. They are very excited about sculpture and are so proud that they know how they can do it now!” said Daryl Stout of the Pinjarra Refinery.
 
At Alcoa, we believe that everyone should have access to the arts because it’s an important part of what brings a community together - our partnership with Sculpture by the Sea is a big part in achieving that.
 
Alcoa acquired the aluminium sculpture ‘hardscape’ (pictured right) by WA based artist Noah Birch.  This will be gifted to one of our communities in the coming months.
 
Noah said aluminium was the perfect material for ‘hardscape’. “Aluminium was a fairly natural choice for this work, given the underlying concept (ill-considered development, so a reflection of the built environment), the ability to achieve the desired finish (its workability), and to create a work with longevity, resistance to corrosion, and suitable for outdoor exhibition. 
 
“The ability to create a solid structure with minimal weight also makes aluminium a desirable material,” Noah said.
 
Read more about our community partnerships.
 
revolutionising computers with aluminium
Apple MacBook Pro’s unibody is receiving rave reviews for being light, strong and environmentally friendly.
 
And what made these results possible? Aluminium.
 
Apple’s Jony Ive, Senior Vice President Design, said: “Traditionally notebooks are made from multiple parts. But the problem is when you have multiple parts you add size and weight, and you increase the opportunity for failure. And the huge breakthrough that we had with the MacBook was to replace all of those parts with just one part, and that one part we call the unibody.
 
“We figured out a way of being able to make the notebook fundamentally thinner, lighter, more robust and with a degree of fit and finish that we’ve never even dreamed of before – and the only way to make that one part was to machine it from a single piece of aluminium.
 
Aluminium was the ideal choice for this product because it provides us the thinness and lightness that we want in the portable category - great strength to weight ratio.  It also provides us with some really nice options from a finishing perspective,” said Dan Riccio, Vice President Product Design.
 
“One of the things I’m most proud of is the environmental story. We’ve achieved a design that is both energy star compliant as well as rated EP Gold,” said Bob Mansfield, Senior Vice President Mac Hardware.
 
“We’ve chosen both material and processings that are the best in the industry from an environmental perspective,” said Jony.


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Students from Harvey Primary School enjoying Sculpture by the Sea



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Alcoa supports the Sculpture by the Sea Alcoa Schools Education Program



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Children make their own sculptures using aluminium wire and aluminium foil



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WA Premier Colin Barnett, Alan Cransberg & artist Noah Birch with 'hardscape'