part of the solution
 
alcoa web-cam keeps eye on peregrine falcons
At Alcoa Anglesea, we continue to do our part in protecting the Peregrine Falcon* – while raising awareness of the species in the community.
 
Alcoa Anglesea has been home to a pair of Peregrine Falcons since 1991.  Following two failed nesting attempts on the Power Station in 2003, our Environmental employees built and installed a special nest box for the birds on Anglesea’s water tower in 2004.  45-metres from the ground, the height of the water tower mimics a shear cliff face, the preferred natural nesting habitat of the Peregrine Falcon.   In 2006, we installed a web-cam to provide a day-to-day account of the birds at one minute intervals.
 
This year the falcon pair, named Havoc and Sheila, took time settling into the nest box, with an intermittent presence in the lead up to the traditional breeding season.  But, once they moved in, they certainly got down to business laying three eggs which have all successfully hatched recently.
 
Only 3% of Peregrine Falcon nests in Victoria are found on man-made structures, so Alcoa Anglesea is pleased to be able to provide a safe and secure site for its favourite residents.
 
Alcoa employees are enjoying the return of the birds they have watched for many years now and are eagerly awaiting the Peregrine Falcon fledglings growing to full sized birds and learning to fly.
 
Alcoa Anglesea Environmental Project Officer, Elise Jeffery, said the web-cam was the culmination of many years of work.
 
“We’ve worked closely with the Victorian Peregrine Project for several years now to ensure our actions assist with the conservation of Peregrine Falcons."
 
“We hope the web-cam will raise the profile of these special birds by allowing students and nature lovers to learn more about their behaviour."
 
“We certainly look forward to seeing the birds back at the station to nest each year and we are very pleased to be able to share this with the broader community”, Elise said.
 
* Peregrine Falcons began dying out around 30 years ago when pesticides — particularly the now banned DDT— spread through the food chain topped by the bird. The birds began dying out as a species worldwide with very few breeding pairs recorded. Wildlife scientists put them on the endangered species list and worked to bring their population back to a healthy level. Thanks to the Australian ban on the pesticide DDT in 1987, increased awareness among egg collectors and diligent efforts from conservationists around the world, the Peregrine Falcon population has made a strong recovery over the past decade. Peregrines are now listed as 'secure’ across Australia.


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Peregrine Falcon



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Peregrine Falcon nesting box at Alcoa Anglesea