Coal Mining Rehabilitation

The area known as the ‘Anglesea Heath’ consists of land leased by Alcoa under the Mines (Aluminium Agreement) Act 1961 (7097 hectares) and an additional 124 hectares of freehold land owned by Alcoa.  Alcoa Anglesea operates in both the leased and freehold area.
 
Today, our primary rehabilitation aim is to reinstate the indigenous heathland community.  Not only does this establish a landscape consistent with the surrounding vegetation, it also satisfies our own
and community expectations that we will attempt to replace where we have mined as accurately as possible. 

The woodland community of the Anglesea Heath is the richest and most diverse vegetation community recorded in Victoria.  Over 620 flora species exist, representing 25% of Victoria’s flora species.  This diversity means reinstating the landscape after mining is challenging.  In 2002 Alcoa Anglesea completed significant work to improve the science behind its coal mine rehabilitation program and adopted the following targets:
 
  • the area of mine rehabilitation should be greater than the area cleared for mining. 
  • mine rehabilitation species richness greater than or equal to 100%.
 
Mine rehabilitation species richness at Anglesea is defined as: ‘the average number of indigenous plant species in 18 month old rehabilitation is 100% of the number found in representative unmined heath sites’.

 
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# No rehabilitation works completed in this year.
* Not Available - species richness is measured 18 months after planting, and therefore figures are not available every year.






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A piece of brown coal from the Anglesea mine